News

Bookmark and Share

Dec 05

BoldIQ Team

BoldIQ featured in Seattle Times

by Team

Bellevue startup BoldIQ gets Boeing boost for business-aviation tool

A small startup scores big with a deal in which it developed a business-aviation system that Boeing’s Jeppesen division offers to its customers.

BoldIQ, a growing Bellevue software company, scored a big deal this winter when Boeing debuted a business-aviation system that uses the small company’s technology.

Boeing’s Jeppesen division launched a new operating system that helps business-airplane companies keep their planes fully staffed and running on time. The cloud-based system, known as Jeppesen Operator, puts flight scheduling, crew management, trip planning, pricing and many other tasks into one place.

“Today in the current state, without a solution like this, what operators have to do is acquire and maintain and use multiple systems that are disparate from each other,” said Mike DiDonato, director of industry services at Jeppesen.

With Jeppesen Operator, a business airline would use BoldIQ’s scheduling software to allow them to plan for flight crews and planes. But the biggest draw is yet to come. 

BoldIQ specializes in optimizing scheduling using an automated system that recognizes priorities and makes sure everything runs smoothly. It automatically readjusts personnel and jobs if a pilot calls in sick or a flight is grounded or something else pops up. 

It can reschedule hundreds of factors in minutes.

That optimization functionality is being added to Jeppesen Operator and is expected to launch in early 2018.

The Bellevue company has 21 employees and is hiring six more, partly bolstered by the Boeing deal. The contract gives it an extra layer of credibility, BoldIQ CEO Roei Ganzarski said.

“It also helps with market access,” he said. “What we’re able to tap into, we could never do that on our own.”

BoldIQ makes scheduling software for aviation and ground-transportation companies, and is developing technology for the health-care industry.

The Operator software, which launched in November, now has six business-aviation company customers, and may branch into commercial airlines to help with cargo planning and other unscheduled areas.

Click here to read the full story online